Rant on misleading statements

I haven’t written anything in a few days, and feel that it is sometimes worth writing simply for the sake of writing. And since there is no way that I could ever go past the storage limits of my server, I figure why not post it! I spent a good portion of the day getting aspects of the blog to work in a method that I find suitable, but I suspect that come January I will probably want to revamp the whole thing. I’m currently reading Chen Guidi and Wu Chuntao’s “Will the Boat Sink the Water”, a good book that examines the turbulent relationship between Chinese peasants and the government. Although many of the problems spoken of within the book are changing (new regulations set forth in 2006 have begun to bring greater aid to the peasant population), its contents are still of great relevance.

Chen and Wu's Book

Chen and Wu's Book

Human rights and social welfare are at the top of the hot-word list on any number of discussions pertaining to China, and though I do not deny their importance, I often read articles and blogs that are too quick to put full blame on the central government for these problems. It is certainly their job to monitor and maintain the problems at hand, but one must remember that such issues do not change overnight, especially within a country with a billion-plus population. It does not take an expert to determine that China is not a democratic society. It is not correct, however, to immediately state that the lack of a democratic government is a problem within China, as democracy may not be the best option for a nation with such a drastic rate of change and development. Yes, I know, saying that democracy might not be the best leads most Americans to scream their heads off. This may be one of our greater faults as a society, as it stems from a mindset which forgets that the vast majority of countries do not have the level of stability that we enjoy. China has a population more than three times the size of the U.S., and certainly has a different need to maintain social stability. As such, it is not so easy as voting to change the style of legal system. No one tool can work for all jobs.

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